A Post Lockdown Adventure

Escape to the countryside

Well at long last we can venture further from home since we have come out of our third lockdown here in Cyprus. We no longer have to request permission to go out and there is no time limit set on the outing. We are now free to travel around the island and stay out as long as we want in line with the agreed government guidelines.

We really enjoy exploring Cyprus when we get the chance especially inland and try our best to find new roads where we haven’t driven before to find hidden gems. From abandoned villages to beautiful scenic views who knows what is round the corner.

This week we have taken a couple of trips out and found a few new roads…….

So on our first day we headed towards Stroumpi to start our adventure and then further inland towards Polemi choosing roads to go as we came across turnings.

As we drove we came to Pano Panagia where we saw signs for Cedar Valley. We had never been there and had been recommended by a friend that it was well worth a visit. It was a lovely drive and amazingly peaceful. We were told that you could hear your voice reverberating around the mountains surrounding the deep valley.

When you think of the Troodos mountains and the winding roads leading to it one of the things that will spring spring to mind are the stunning sweet scented pine trees that blanket the rugged peaks. With our windows open and the roof down the scent of pine was everywhere. As you travel deeper into the Paphos Forest you’ll soon spot these pine trees changing to thousands of magnificent bright green Cyprus Cedar trees claiming their pride of place on the stony mountain sides.

Next we managed to find a bailey bridge – first one I have ever seen. I didn’t realise these bridges were built by the military. The idea was developed in the 1940s for use during the Second World War. A Bailey bridge (has the advantages of requiring no special tools or heavy equipment to assemble.

Built of wood and steel the bridge elements are small and light enough to be carried in trucks and lifted into place by hand, without the use of a crane. The bridges were strong enough to carry tanks. Bailey bridges continue to be used extensively in civil engineering construction projects and to provide temporary crossings for pedestrian and vehicle traffic.

Trozena Bailey Bridge

The Trozena Bridge spanning the Diarizos River was built during the British occupation in Cyprus to link the then populated villages of Trozena and Gerovasa

Trozena and Gerovosa were part of a complex of settlements inhabited by Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots. Gerovosa was mainly a Turkish Cypriot village and the name in Greek means holy valley whereas Trozena was predominantly Greek Cypriot. The residents lived together in harmony however with the outbreak of bi-communal unrest between the years 1963-1964, the settlement of Gerovasa was abandoned by its Turkish Cypriot residents. Trozena was still populated until the 1980s, but by the 1990s, the trend of moving to urbanisations intensified, and by 2001, there were no longer any permanent residents left.

Route to the Bailey Bridge

If you fancy escaping the sun, sand and sea one day when you visit Cyprus why not take a trip out to see some history and some beautiful scenery too.

One thought on “A Post Lockdown Adventure

  1. Enjoyed seeing the pine forests and the Bailey Bridge, very very interesting and your lovely pictures, well done to you, keep up your good work Fionna, very enjoyable

    Liked by 1 person

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